Boundary Disputes 2017-09-22T05:38:45+00:00

Boundary Disputes

Boundary disputes are a complicated area of law, and many people believe that boundaries run in straight lines around the edge of land, however this isn’t generally the case and it is far more complex than this. Other boundary disputes include determining who is responsible for replacing or mending damaged boundary wall and fences. At Muldoon Britton solicitors, we are able to help you to settle boundary disputes amicably.

Boundaries can change over time is in many instances, various factors can shape and change the boundary of land or property. Issues can also arise when Land Registry records and plans are relied on to determine boundaries, and it is often believed that these plants are drawn to the correct specification and use them to put up boundary walls and fences, when in fact these are not to scale or correct – they are simply to roughly demonstrate the boundary. For land registry purposes.

Boundary dispute solicitors such as ourselves are able to help you to resolve disputes and can bring in experts who can scrutinise Title Deeds of land or property to ascertain the proper boundaries and which boundaries you are responsible for. These experts can use other evidence in addition such as old photographs of boundaries, the actual property or land itself, original property plans and witness evidence to determine where the boundary should lie. Farther disputes can arise where two neighbours both find their own expert who believes their claim is correct. Muldoon Britton solicitors can settle disputes between neighbours and experts to determine the correct boundaries of a property, and settle a dispute in court where necessary.

It is important to note however that litigation (going through the courts) should be a last resort, and that mediation and negotiation with hard evidence to back up your case should always be your first port of call. At Muldoon Britton, our expert solicitors are able to review the evidence and the opinions of experts to determine a property boundary and to have both parties sign to agree to the final decision to prevent further disputes arising in the future.